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1987, Results, Uncategorized

1987 HoME Election Results

I don't think they're celebrating the 1987 HoME election results.

I don’t think they’re celebrating the 1987 HoME election results. Juiced ball, un-juiced results.

In celebration of this, our nation’s day of independence, we at the HoME have decided to elect, um, nobody. It’s our 27th election, and this is the first time one of our roman candles fizzled out. Further, we’ve managed to elect only four players in the last four elections total. Since we still have 122 of the greatest players in the game’s history in the HoME, and we’re still planning on 212 at the end, it’ll take us only 90 more elections at the rate we’ve been going the last two months to fill our hallowed cyber-halls.

Lest you think we’re relaxing as summer approaches its dog days, in addition to the players we discuss below, we’ve had spirited conversations of late about Sal Bando, Bobby Bonds, Roger Bresnahan, Willie Davis, Harry Hooper, and others. But as of yet, no votes. Let’s hope 1988 will be different.

Per our rules, players have to be named on both ballots for induction. Our ballots this year are exactly the same as they were last year except that we’ve omitted the elected Willie McCovey.

    Miller            Eric
1   Red Faber         Roy White
2                     Dave Bancroft
Blame it on the date? Mickey Welch is probably the best player in history born on July 4, outdistancing George Mullin and Vinny Castilla.

Blame it on the date? Mickey Welch is probably the best player in history born on July 4, outdistancing George Mullin and Vinny Castilla.

When we don’t agree on who should get elected, we feel the need to explain our solo votes. Those brief explanations are below.

Miller:
Red Faber: There continues to be little else to say regarding Faber. I rank him #44 among pitchers. My partner disagrees; his system sees him at #48 right now. I honestly don’t know whether or not we’re close to electing Faber.

Eric:
Roy White: I prefer White to Bob Johnson, already a HoMEr, and he’s very close to HoMEr Zack Wheat. An unsung hero of the 1970s Yankees who somehow managed to go virtually unnoticed in the media metropolis of New York.

Dave Bancroft: While there are differences between he and Sewell, they are very similar. I began voting for Sewell and Bancroft simultaneously, and I still see them as being equally plaque-worthy.

That’s all for our very simple 1987 election. Please visit our Honorees page to see the plaques of those elected and to see plenty more information about the HoME.

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