you're reading...
1987, RIP, Obituaries of Players We're No Longer Considering

RIP, Players Falling Off the 1987 Ballot

Burried here is Hugh Duffy, a Hall of Famer, but a player who came up short in his HoME run.

Burried here is Hugh Duffy, a Hall of Famer, but a player who came up short in his HoME run.

After a 1987 election that took place on Friday producing no results (actually, there was a result, but no electees), one might think that our death toll this election would be high. In fact, that’s not the case. Our backlog has pretty much been shrinking since 1941, and for the second consecutive election, we reviewed the cases of only 44 players in 1987. I would guess that our backlog will remain relatively steady, if shrinking, from not until the time we’re done with this process.

We did learn this election that a few players won’t ever be HoMErs. And to make our future work easier, we remove them from intellectual consideration and offer these obituaries to honor their careers. There are 744 players who have been or will be up for consideration, and there have been 27 elections through 1987. In that time 122 have been elected, and another 347 have been put to rest. We now have 275 players to consider for our 90 remaining spots in the HoME. So we can elect nearly 33% of our remaining candidates.

Please read more about the dead below and by looking over our RIP category.

Interested in seeing how we got here? After each election, I’ll offer the following chart to keep you apprised of our progress.

 

Year   Carried     New      Considered   Elected   Obituaries  Continuing to
         Over    Nominees  this Election                       Next Election
1987      44         3          47          0           3           44
1986      44         4          48          1           3           44
1985      47        10          57          1          12           44
1984      50         5          55          2           6           47
1983      52         8          60          5           5           50
1982      51         8          59          3           4           52
1981      59         8          67          1          15           51
1980      59         8          67          3           5           59
1979      67         6          73          6           8           59
1978      78         6          84          5          12           67
1977      86         6          92          2          11           79
1976      82        26         108          6          16           86
1971      87        21         108          6          20           82
1966      94        26         120          7          26           87
1961      91        24         115          6          15           94
1956      92        32         124          7          26           91
1951      93        27         120          9          19           92
1946      94        26         120          8          19           93
1941      82        29         111          5          12           94
1936      75        29         104          8          14           82
1931      69        17          86          2           9           75
1926      71        25          96          9          18           69
1921      66        27          93          4          18           71
1916      53        31          84          5          13           66
1911      47        20          67          5           9           53
1906      33        28          61          3          11           47
1901       0        54          54          3          18           33

Dead in 1987

Hugh DuffyIn 1894 Hugh Duffy set the all-time single-season record by hitting .440 for the National League’s Boston Beaneaters. As you might expect, that year was a bit fluky at 6.8 WAR. His next two top seasons were in the American Association (4.7 WAR) and the Players League (4.2 WAR). Funnily enough, Bill James called Duffy’s slugging percentage in 1894 the greatest fluke SLG of all-time, but didn’t say so about his batting average. Upon very little investigation, this characterization makes sense since Duffy slugged .694 that year and never higher than .482 in any other season. The killing of Duffy ties him with Bob Caruthers with 25 elections of review before a departure. That’s now second most ever. See below. Cheerio, Sir Hugh.

Mike MarshallLots of baseball fans will refer to Cal Ripken and Lou Gehrig as baseball’s iron men. Maybe Joe McGinnity? Others will refer to 1970s relief pitcher extraordinaire, Mike Marshall, as such. And they’d be right. The guy pitched in 198 games and threw 387.1 innings in 1973 and 1974, all in relief. He holds both the AL record for games pitched in a season with 90 for the Twins in 1979, and the major league record with 106 for the Dodgers five years earlier. That season he also set another record that seems unfathomable today. He pitched for the Dodgers in 13 consecutive games. And we’re not talking some lefty specialist called on to get one batter out and then take leave. During the stretch, Marshall pitched at least two innings eight times and only once threw less than one inning. What’s more, he was awesome during that run – two saves, two holds and six, yes, six wins. By the way, his streak ended in the second game of the double header on July 3, and Marshall came back with a win on July 4, another successful outing on July 5, and saves in both halves of the double header on July 7.

Cal McVeyMany of those who like baseball statistics love runs batted in. They show who’s clutch! Those who like baseball statistics in the manner we do at the HoME like runs batted in a lot less. They show who has opportunity. I’m not sure who loves NABBP, NA, and NL C/1B Cal McVey, but I do know he’s the man who holds the National Association record for career runs batted in. And opportunity was even more of a big deal in the days of the National Association than it is today. See, there were twenty-five total teams in the five years of the NA. Only seven of them played in more than two seasons, just three of them played in every season, and teams routinely played unbalanced schedules. For example, McVey’s Boston Red Stockings played 79 games in 1875. But there were other teams that played just 13 games or 14 or 19 or 28 or 47 or 49. See, it’s opportunity. And I’d like to take this opportunity to congratulate Cal McVey, the current record holder for most times reviewed by our esteemed HoME election committee before dismissal – 27.

That’s it for this election. Please visit our Honorees page to see the plaques of those who have made it into the HoME, and check back here after the 1988 election for more obituaries.

Miller

Advertisements

Discussion

No comments yet.

Tell us what you think!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Institutional History

%d bloggers like this: