you're reading...
2005, RIP, Obituaries of Players We're No Longer Considering

RIP, Players Falling Off the 2005 Ballot

Cupid Childs' Grave

Cupid Childs’ Grave

From a standpoint of food, our 2005 obituaries are tasty and utterly disgusting. We have candy, strawberries, and chili. But we also have rats and children. Sort of. Is it possible that rats are the healthiest of all of those foods? Even if that’s the case, that’s better discussed in another blog, right? Anyway, in all, we have five obituaries to offer, four coming from guys new to the ballot in 2005 and one from someone we’ve been reviewing for nearly a century.

With Wade Boggs and Bret Saberhagen getting elected on Friday, we now have now enshrined 179 of the game’s greats in our 45 elections. Just 36 more to go! And our death toll has now reached 470 obituaries with the five we’ll bid farewell below. In all, we have only 102 of our 752 nominees to review for our 36 remaining HoME spots. Thus, we can elect a bit over 35% of the remaining population.

For those interested in keeping track, which I’m completely certain is every last one of you, here’s the tally from each election since our first in 1901. No children or rats were harmed in the building of this chart.

Year   Carried     New      Considered   Elected   Obituaries  Continuing to
         Over    Nominees  this Election                       Next Election
2005      12         8          20          2           5           13
2004      13         8          21          4           5           12
2003      14         7          21          2           6           13
2002      18         7          25          6           5           14
2001      23         8          31          2          11           18
2000      26         9          35          1          11           23
1999      30         9          39          4           9           26
1998      33         9          42          4           8           30
1997      40         3          43          3           7           33
1996      42         7          49          4           5           40
1995      41        11          52          4           6           42
1994      38       8+1          47          3           3           41
1993      41         9          50          3           9           38
1992      40        10          50          3           6           41
1991      40         9          49          1           8           40
1990      42         9          51          3           8           40
1989      45        10          55          6           7           42
1988      44         7          51          2           4           45   
1987      44         3          47          0           3           44
1986      44         4          48          1           3           44
1985      47        10          57          1          12           44
1984      50         5          55          2           6           47
1983      52         8          60          5           5           50
1982      51         8          59          3           4           52
1981      59         8          67          1          15           51
1980      59         8          67          3           5           59
1979      67         6          73          6           8           59
1978      78         6          84          5          12           67
1977      86         6          92          2          11           79
1976      82        26         108          6          16           86
1971      87        21         108          6          20           82
1966      94        26         120          7          26           87
1961      91        24         115          6          15           94
1956      92        32         124          7          26           91
1951      93        27         120          9          19           92
1946      94        26         120          8          19           93
1941      82        29         111          5          12           94
1936      75        29         104          8          14           82
1931      69        17          86          2           9           75
1926      71        25          96          9          18           69
1921      66        27          93          4          18           71
1916      53        31          84          5          13           66
1911      47        20          67          5           9           53
1906      33        28          61          3          11           47
1901       0        54          54          3          18           33

Dead in 2005

Tom CandiottiLike virtually everyone else who could control a knuckleball, Tom Candiotti had a long and productive career. He led the league in losses twice and only once topped 15 wins, yet he won 151 career games. Overall, he posed six seasons of 4+ WAR and is about the 150th best pitcher in our data set. That’s not saying a ton, but it’s better than a few Hall of Famers.

It was a tough end for Cupid Childs, the second baseman who played most of his days for the Cleveland Spiders right before the turn of last century. Clarence, who died of Bright’s disease at the age of 45, was one of the best hitting second basemen of his day, and he was said to have outstanding range. His RAA supports the former, and his DRA supports the latter. If we were to put 225 players in the HoME rather than 215, there’s a great shot he’d have made it. Ultimately, we decided we might be more interested in Tony Phillips and/or Jeff Kent. But what we really decided was that Childs’ era was already full and that he didn’t stand out enough for us to overfill.

Chili DavisA fine hitter who wore his first name on the back of his jersey, Chili Davis reached double figures in HR every season from 1982-1997. His career high of 30 came in 1997 at the age of 37. The first Jamaican-born player ever in the bigs hit 350 career bombs and made a pair of All-Star teams. In all, he had ten seasons worth 2+ WAR. Not bad.

Gary GaettiGary Gaetti brought to the table considerable power and outstanding defense. The 3B hit 20+ homers eight times, and he took home the Gold Glove every year from 1986-1989, the last two of which he made the All-Star team too. Overall, he smacked 360 long balls. In the playoffs, he homered in his first two appearances, both against Doyle Alexander and the Tigers in the 1987 ALCS. And he also started two triple plays against the Red Sox in a 1990 game. Overall, he was pretty similar in value to Heinie Zimmerman or Doug DeCinces.

Darryl Strawberry, SIFew players have been as hyped or have had as much natural athletic ability as Darryl Strawberry. And were it not for his substance abuse, there’s a real chance he wouldn’t be getting a HoME obituary. As a 21-year-old, Straw hit 26 homers and won the NL Rookie of the Year. He made the All-Star team for the next eight seasons, averaging more than 31 homers per campaign. He led the NL in bombs 1988 and finished second in the MVP voting. He’s one of three guys to play for all four NY franchises – the Yankees, Mets, Dodgers, and Giants. And he’s one of five to hit two pinch grand slams in a season. Strawberry has been out of the news – the scandal sheets, anyway – for some time. Here’s hoping it stays that way and he has a long and prosperous life ahead of him.

That’s all for 2005. Please check out our Honorees page to see the plaques of our new members and all of the HoMErs. And check back here after the 2006 election for more obituaries.

Miller

Advertisements

Discussion

No comments yet.

Tell us what you think!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Institutional History

%d bloggers like this: