you're reading...
2015, RIP, Obituaries of Players We're No Longer Considering

RIP, Players Falling Off the 2015 Ballot

Nomar GarciaparraThis post stinks. It’s the last of the posts we had planned when we welcomed all of you to our project some 26 months ago. For me, this process has been a pleasure, and I’m sad that it’s kind of over (even though we’re going to keep writing periodically). It’s allowed me to work with a great baseball analyst and writer, someone who I’m proud to call a friend, Eric. And it’s helped me to learn so much more about the game that I treasure. Plus, it’s surprisingly cool to use the phrase “my blog” in casual conversation.

Enough about me. You’re here for the last set of obituaries. We started with an empty HoME. And we’re now filled, at least until the Hall elects more, with what we believe are the 215 greatest players eligible, at least by our definitions. We also started without any obituaries and no plan at all to write them. But now we’ve written 538 in total, both for the pretty good and for the nearly HoME-worthy.

Want to read exactly how we got here? Below is the tally from every single election we’ve held. All 55 of them.

Year   Carried     New      Considered   Elected   Obituaries  Continuing to
         Over    Nominees  this Election                       Next Election
2014       0        11          11          5           6            0
2013       0        15          15          7           8            0
2012       5         5          10          1           9            0
2011       6         9          15          4           6            5
2010       8         9          17          3           8            6
2009      10         8          18          4           6            8
2008      11         7          18          2           6           10 
2007      12        15          27          5          11           11
2006      13         5          18          1           5           12
2005      12         8          20          2           5           13
2004      13         8          21          4           5           12
2003      14         7          21          2           6           13
2002      18         7          25          6           5           14
2001      23         8          31          2          11           18
2000      26         9          35          1          11           23
1999      30         9          39          4           9           26
1998      33         9          42          4           8           30
1997      40         3          43          3           7           33
1996      42         7          49          4           5           40
1995      41        11          52          4           6           42
1994      38       8+1          47          3           3           41
1993      41         9          50          3           9           38
1992      40        10          50          3           6           41
1991      40         9          49          1           8           40
1990      42         9          51          3           8           40
1989      45        10          55          6           7           42
1988      44         7          51          2           4           45   
1987      44         3          47          0           3           44
1986      44         4          48          1           3           44
1985      47        10          57          1          12           44
1984      50         5          55          2           6           47
1983      52         8          60          5           5           50
1982      51         8          59          3           4           52
1981      59         8          67          1          15           51
1980      59         8          67          3           5           59
1979      67         6          73          6           8           59
1978      78         6          84          5          12           67
1977      86         6          92          2          11           79
1976      82        26         108          6          16           86
1971      87        21         108          6          20           82
1966      94        26         120          7          26           87
1961      91        24         115          6          15           94
1956      92        32         124          7          26           91
1951      93        27         120          9          19           92
1946      94        26         120          8          19           93
1941      82        29         111          5          12           94
1936      75        29         104          8          14           82
1931      69        17          86          2           9           75
1926      71        25          96          9          18           69
1921      66        27          93          4          18           71
1916      53        31          84          5          13           66
1911      47        20          67          5           9           53
1906      33        28          61          3          11           47
1901       0        54          54          3          18           33

Dead in 2015

Carlos DelgadoWhen you played at the same time as Thome, Thomas, McGwire, Olerud, Clark, McGriff, and others, it’s easy to get lost as a first baseman. To an extent, Carlos Delgado and his 473 home runs got lost. He made only two All-Star teams and never went to a World Series. I guess getting lost isn’t shocking. Of course, he was great the one time he reached the playoffs, hitting .351/.442/.757 in 2006. He also homered three times against the Cards that year in a losing effort. And only 16 players ever can top him in HR and 2B. Every one of them is in the HoME or going. Delgado was pretty great, just not great enough.

Nomar Garciaparra was on his way to the Hall of Fame. He was 29, had been an All-Star five times, had 173 homers from the shortstop position, and had won the 1997 AL Rookie of the Year. But to the 41 WAR he had through 2003, he added only three more wins in his final six seasons and was out of baseball at age 35. Trivially, he’s the only player ever to hit two grand slams in one game in front of his home fans. The other twelve all did it on the road.

Brian GilesWonderfully underrated during his time, Brian Giles might have been a Hall of Famer had he come up with a different franchise or at a different time. Giles was a very effective player in AAA in 1994 and 1995. It wasn’t until 1996 that he got any real time in the majors, and it wasn’t even much then. That’s what happens when Albert Belle, Manny Ramirez, and Eddie Murray occupy your corner OF and DH spots. When Giles got the chance, he excelled. And when he was shipped to Pittsburgh in 1999 he became a star. In his first four seasons there, he was among the half dozen most valuable hitters in the game, even though he made only two All-Star teams. For overall value, think Hall of Famers Sam Thompson and Enos Slaughter. He doesn’t deserve to get in, but it’s a shame Brian Giles won’t see another Hall of Fame ballot.

Tom GordonQuite an interesting career was had by starter turned closer, turned set-up man, turned closer, Tom Gordon. That first sentence pretty much explains it. Gordon won 17 games as a rookie Royal, he led the AL in saves and made the All-Star team for the Red Sox, he was an outstanding set-up man and again an All-Star with the Yankees, and he made his third and final All-Star team as a closer for the Phillies. Don’t ask Gordon about the playoffs. In 21 appearances he had a 7.06 ERA. It’s not clear why teams kept pitching him.

That’s it. We’re caught up, which should be wonderful, but is bittersweet. Like I said above though, the Hall of Miller and Eric isn’t going away. We may have a less ambitious schedule going forward than we had in the past, but we’ll still be here. As always, please take a look at our Honorees page to see the plaques of all of the members of our HoME. And you should absolutely check back around the time of the Pre-Integration Ballot in December and the BBWAA ballot in January. Thanks for reading!

Miller

Advertisements

Discussion

One thought on “RIP, Players Falling Off the 2015 Ballot

  1. Weeping, wailing, gnashing teeth that it is over.
    v

    Posted by verdun2 | August 17, 2015, 9:03 am

Tell us what you think!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Institutional History

%d bloggers like this: