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Managers

Phase II, Election I

Frank Selee, 2The first election in our second phase was a fun one, as long as it doesn’t take controversy for you to have fun. Eric and I, without getting into the type of deep research we know we’ll need to do justice to this project, simply agreed on the fates of four of our remaining 29 candidates. Today obituaries will be written for Jim Mutire, Wilbert Robinson, and George Stallings. And the twelfth member of the manager wing of the HoME will be immortalized. That man is Frank Selee.

Let’s first take care of some business. There are now twelve managers in the Hall of Miller and Eric.

Walter Alston       Joe McCarthy
Sparky Anderson     John McGraw
Bobby Cox           Frank Selee
Miller Huggins      Casey Stengel
Tony LaRussa        Joe Torre
Connie Mack         Earl Weaver

And there are now just twenty-five men we’ll consider for the remaining ten spots.

                                                          G>	WS    Flags
                  Yrs     From       W      L     %     .500    Won   Won    Teams
===================================================================================
Cap Anson	   21	1875-1898   1295    947	  .578	 348	 0     5       3
Frank Chance	   11	1905-1923    946    648	  .593	 298     2     4       3
Fred Clarke	   19	1897-1915   1602   1181	  .576	 421	 1     4       2
Charlie Comiskey   12	1883-1894    840    541	  .608	 299	 1     4       3
Leo Durocher	   24	1939-1973   2008   1709	  .540	 299	 1     3       4
Clark Griffith	   20	1901-1920   1491   1367	  .522	 124	 0     1       4
Charlie Grimm	   19	1932-1960   1287   1067	  .547	 220	 0     3       2
Ned Hanlon	   19	1889-1907   1313   1164	  .530	 149	 0     5       5
Bucky Harris	   29	1924-1956   2158   2219	  .493	 -61	 2     3       5
Whitey Herzog	   18	1973-1990   1281   1125	  .532	 156	 1     3       4
Ralph Houk	   20	1961-1984   1619   1531	  .514	  88	 2     3       3
Hughie Jennings	   16	1907-1925   1184    995	  .543	 189	 0     3       2
Tommy Lasorda	   21	1976-1996   1599   1439	  .526	 160	 2     4       1
Al Lopez	   17	1951-1969   1410   1004	  .584	 406	 0     2       2
Billy Martin	   16	1969-1988   1253   1013	  .553	 240	 1     2       5
Bill McKechnie	   25	1915-1946   1896   1723	  .524	 173	 2     4       5
Danny Murtaugh	   15	1957-1976   1115    950	  .540	 165	 2     2       1
Steve O'Neill	   14	1935-1954   1040    821	  .559	 219	 1     1       4
Lou Piniella	   23	1986-2010   1835   1713	  .517	 122	 1     1       5
Frank Robinson	   16	1975-2006   1065   1176	  .475	-111	 0     0       4
Red Schoendienst   14	1965-1990   1041    955	  .522	  86	 1     2       1
Billy Southworth   13	1929-1951   1044    704	  .597	 340	 2     4       2
Bill Terry	   10	1932-1941    823    661	  .555	 162	 1     3       1
Dick Williams	   21	1967-1988   1571   1451	  .520	 120	 2     4       6
Harry Wright	   23	1871-1893   1225    885	  .581	 340	 0     6       4

Hall of Miller and Eric

Frank Selee becomes the twelfth member of the Hall of Miller and Eric’s manager wing. He gets in, I’ll admit, without a lot of conversation. That’s how Bobby Cox and John McGraw got in too, so it’s probably a good thing. Selee could quite reasonably be called the first of the modern managers. He wasn’t like the glorified traveling secretaries who came before him, nor was he a player/manager employed to keep ownership from having to pay two salaries. He was a professional. Earlier in his career, we won five pennants with the Boston Beaneaters. Later, he put together the incredible defensive Tinker-to-Evers-to-Chance Chicago Cub teams. He won more games than Whitey Herzog even though his teams only twice played 150 games in a year. The Birnbaum database classifies Selee as one of nine guys in the top-20 both in terms of offense and pitching. In a piece of his manager book I remembered before research on this project, Bill James said that Frank Selee would never make the Hall of Fame. But the Veterans Committee elected him in 1999. The Hall got it right. Now we have too.

Obituaries

Jim Mutrie was a business manager, an incredibly successful one. But he wasn’t a manager in the way we think of them today. So we basically eliminated Mutrie without a thorough exploration of his record. And truth be told, if he were treated fairly, he’d be receiving his obituary in short order anyway. He won the American Association pennant with the Metropolitans in 1884. And he won the series tantamount to what would become the World Series with the 1888-1889 Giants. Overall he won 658 games with a .611 winning percentage. Great at what he did, no doubt, but Mutrie didn’t have the managerial career we’re looking for at the HoME.

Wilbert Robinson is a Hall of Fame manager. So says the 1945 Old Timers Committee. Overall, he seems to have been not so much more than an average skipper. He won a couple of pennants, losing the World Series with the Brooklyn Robins (named after him, I think) in 1916 and 1920. He won 90 games on three occasions and retired just 1399 wins, just one game above .500. I’m not sure why he’s in the Hall of Fame, to be honest. Well, he was called “Uncle Robbie” so there’s that. He won’t be moving on.

George Stallings in all of his platooning-goodness managed the “Miracle Braves” of 1914 to an improbable World Series title. The impact he had with that team was remarkable. Basically everyone platooned at a minimum of one spot for the next decade. He was a good manager overall, as his teams’ improvement with him and regression once he left is evident. He only won once though, and he finished in the top-three only four times in his eleven full seasons. With 879 wins at a .495 clip, he’s not HoMEward bound.

The next results will take place next week. Tune in then.

Miller

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