you're reading...
Negro Leagues

Evaluating More Negro Leagues Pitchers, Part 1

[All MLEs updated 7/4/18 to include (a) new 1938 and 1947 data (b) new baserunning-runs estimates(c) new, more objective playing-time estimates]

[Note: Updated 1/20/18 to include adjustment that accounts for general differences in pitcher-batting ability between MLB and Negro Leagues.]

You want to find out about more Negro Leagues stars? We know you do because our Negro Leagues articles have proven to be very popular with our readers. Thank you for coming here and enjoying the process of learning about the Negro Leagues with us!

Well, today, we kick off the second phase of our Negro Leagues tour. We’ve previously circled the diamond to bring you MLEs for every player inducted into the Halls of Fame and Merit. With this article, we delve into the rest of the field.

We were pretty sure when we got rolling on this project that part of its value would be in bringing forward additional players whose names haven’t been bandied about very frequently in discussions of Negro Leagues greats (except perhaps at the Hall of Merit). We didn’t anticipate any GOAT candidates would magically appear before us, but we felt reasonably sure that at least a few players would emerge as strong contenders for the Hall of Miller and Eric. Spoiler: Some do step forward. Another spoiler: Most don’t.

Overall the various Halls have done a good job locating the most impressive Negro Leagues players. But at the margins, there’s at least a few elected fellows that could end up outside our doors. Yet another spoiler: Judy Johnson will definitely end up outside our doors.

So here’s how this is going to go. Because there’s a skillion or so pitchers to work through, we’re going to flip back and forth between pitchers and a given position. That means you’ll get a week of pitchers then multiple weeks of first basemen then a week of pitchers then multiple weeks of second baseman, and so one until we exhaust the queue. There’s a lot of dudes for us to sift through, and we suspect that barring some unforeseen and unfortunate life event, we’ll be providing new MLEs nearly every Wednesday through roughly August or September. That includes MLEs for some players that, to our knowledge, haven’t been MLE’ed before or that are no longer available at sites that used to carry them.

So today we start with five Negro Leagues pitchers you’ve probably never heard of unless you’re pretty hardcore: Walter Ball, Dave Barnhill, William Bell, Ramon “el Profesor” Bragaña, and Gene Bremer. We have previously described method for creating Major League Equivalencies (MLEs) for Negro Leagues pitchers. In case you need a lengthy, insanely detailed reminder of what’s under the hood.

Thanks for coming with us on this journey! As always, we welcome your questions, comments, and suggestions. Please also note that some of the players we show you may have a lot less information known about them than the more famous folks we’ve already described. That’s just how this thing goes, and we’re sorry that we can’t always give these guys as much love as they deserve.

Walter Ball

Translation of Ball’s record suggest he was something like Waite Hoyt, Herb Pennock, or Red Ruffing on the mound. He had a long career with a few very good seasons and a lot of seasons at or below average. He could, like so many Negro Leagues moundsmen hit a little too.

According to Jim Riley’s biographical notes, Ball played mostly with white amateur, semi-pro, and low-level teams as he got his career underway. He finally debuted at the top level at age 25 in 1903. He had his last truly high-quality season at 31 and hung on for a long time thereafter. However, he was known as one of the top hurlers in blackball in the 1910s along with Rube Foster, Harry Buckner (we’ll meet him next time), and Danny McClelland (watch for him down the road). His reputation was such that in the 1920s he toured with a team bearing his name as the marquee attraction, and he was chosen as a coach for the East-West All-Star Game in 1935 and 1936.

Walter Ball
Negro Leagues Stats | Bio
Career: 1903–1923
Destination: NL 1932–1921
Missing data: 1915–1916, 1918
 
               PITCHING          |  BATTING    |  TOTAL
YEAR  AGE   IP  RAA   WAA   WAR  |  PA    WAR  |   WAR
========================================================
1903   25  270   24   2.5   5.3  |   90   0.2  |   5.5
1904   26  290   12   1.4   4.3  |   97   0.1  |   4.4
1905   27  260  - 8  -0.9   1.8  |   87   0.1  |   2.0
1906   28  300   33   4.3   7.1  |  100   0.1  |   7.2
1907   29  300   36   5.0   7.7  |  100   0.1  |   7.9
1908   30  310   27   3.8   6.6  |  103   0.1  |   6.8
1909   31  290   24   3.0   5.8  |   97   0.2  |   6.0
1910   32  290  - 1  -0.1   2.8  |   97   0.1  |   2.9
1911   33  250  -13  -1.3   1.3  |   83   0.2  |   1.5
1912   34  250  -19  -1.9   0.8  |   83   0.2  |   1.0
1913   35  210  - 1  -0.1   2.0  |   70   0.2  |   2.2
1914   36  160    5   0.6   2.1  |   53   0.1  |   2.3
1915   37  210    3   0.4   2.4  |   70   0.1  |   2.6
1916   38  150    3   0.4   1.8  |   50   0.1  |   1.9
1917   39  100    2   0.2   1.2  |   33   0.0  |   1.2
1918   40   50  - 1  -0.1   0.4  |   17   0.0  |   0.4
1919   41   20  - 2  -0.3  -0.1  |    7   0.0  |   0.0
-------------------------------------------------------
TOTAL     3710  125  17.0  53.6  | 1237   2.2  |  55.7

Hypothetical MLB career rankings (1871–1960)
Innings pitched: 31st
Pitching Wins Above Average: 85th
Pitching Wins Above Replacement: 39th
Total Wins Above Replacement (pitchers only): 43rd

Ball appears to have been a work horse, and these innings totals could be a little conservative, but when we pulled comps with similar attributes in terms of innings, WAA, and tried to adjust his innings appropriately, he eased in a little under 4,000 innings.

Something that’s important to note here. We have Ball reaching at least 300 innings in three seasons. Among the ten closest pitchers we could find to his profile, just six reached 300 innings in any season. Removing them from the list for a moment, the others averaged three or four such seasons among them. It’s possible we owe him one more 300 inning season, and that our innings total is a little low, but we’ll leave it to the reader to either tell us so or to adjust any pitcher’s innings total to reflect their own beliefs. This aspect of creating an MLE is especially imprecise.

Dave Barnhill

Here’s an unheralded player. Barnhill didn’t make the Negro Leagues proper until age 27 in 1941. He’d spent the previous four seasons as “Impo,” a member of the Ethiopian Clowns and other clowning touring teams whose place in the history and lore of the Negro Leagues is something like that of the Harlem Globetrotters in basketball. Except that where the Trotters’ stars are older players who do tricks, these teams also featured younger players with a lot of talent. Like Dave Barnhill, who was 22 when he first found himself on this circuit. While today an NBA team would not recruit from the Globetrotters, the Negro Leagues’ player development process was more helper skelter, less efficient than their contemporary MLB counterparts. But eventually the cream rises to the top.

Once he reached the black big leagues, Barnhill pitched outstanding baseball. His 131 ERA+ is 25th all-time among players currently in the Negro Leagues database. He could really bring it, and his K% is 9th all-time in the leagues, and his K/BB rate is 5th all-time. In his own time (1941 to 1945), his strikeout record is second only to that of the great Satchel Paige in the Negro Leagues. This level of performance is supported by his winter league performance, where he led the Puerto Rican and Cuban Winter League each in punchouts.

Barnhill played a key role in driving the New York Cubans to their one and only championship in 1947, but unfortunately we don’t yet have his stats for 1947 and 1948 in the Negro Leagues Database. He entered the American Association in 1949, teaming with Ray Dandridge on the Minneapolis Millers. Outwardly Barnhill’s stats don’t seem impressive, but the 35 year old pitched in a bandbox with park factors that we estimate around 110 annually for his 1949–1951 tenure. His inaugural season wasn’t all that great, though he still maintained a strong K-rate. In 1950, however, he was among the better pitchers in the league when he took the hill. Despite only throwing 140 innings, he finished third in the loop in strikeouts. In 1951, the now 37 year old slid then finished up in the Florida International League for two seasons.

Like many players of his age cohort and era, Barnhill’s career zigged and zagged in ways that our modern baseball eyes aren’t used to tracking. In addition, missing data complicates the story further, leaving us a tantalizing picture of an excellent pitcher, but one that still feels just a little shy of complete.

Dave Barnhill
Negro Leagues Stats | Minor League Stats | Bio
Career: 1937–1953
Destination: NL 1937–1952
Missing data: 1948
                PITCHING         |   BATTING   |  TOTAL
YEAR  AGE   IP  RAA   WAA   WAR  |   PA   WAR  |   WAR
=======================================================
1937   23  170   15   1.5   3.2  |   57   0.2  |   3.4
1938   24  190   18   1.9   3.8  |   63   0.2  |   4.1
1939   25  210   19   2.1   4.2  |   70   0.2  |   4.4
1940   26  270   27   2.9   5.7  |   90   0.3  |   6.0
1941   27  250   32   3.6   6.1  |   83   0.3  |   6.4
1942   28  250   19   2.3   4.8  |   83   0.3  |   5.0
1943   29  260   31   3.7   6.2  |   87   0.2  |   6.4
1944   30  260    4   0.4   3.1  |   87   0.2  |   3.3
1945   31  250    3   0.3   2.9  |   83   0.2  |   3.1
1946   32  260    2   0.2   2.8  |   87   0.3  |   3.1
1947   33  210    3   0.3   2.5  |   70   0.2  |   2.7
1948   34  210    9   1.0   3.1  |   70   0.2  |   3.3
1949   35  200  - 6  -0.6   1.5  |   67   0.2  |   1.7
1950   36  160    7   0.7   2.3  |   53   0.2  |   2.5
1951   37  110    5   0.6   1.6  |   37   0.1  |   1.7
1952   38   50    7   0.8   1.3  |   17   0.1  |   1.3
-------------------------------------------------------
TOTAL     3310  194  21.8  55.0  | 1104   3.5  |  58.5

Hypothetical MLB career rankings (1871–1960)
Innings pitched: 50th
Pitching Wins Above Average: 58th
Pitching Wins Above Replacement: t-39th
Total Wins Above Replacement (pitchers only): t-35th

I feel like this one might be overshooting a little bit. The data we have for Barnhill shows a really good pitcher, but until we have all the post-war data, I feel uncomfortable. The arrival of 1947 data confirms this concern, and its inclusion has reduced the MLE appropriately.

That said, if you wanted to ask what kind of pitcher Barnhill resembled, then we can use the BBREF Play Index (subscribe now!) to narrow it down. Zeroing in on inactive pitchers from any era with 2700–3700 innings and 19–29 pitching WAA, we get 30 names, among whom the following had similarly long careers, by which I mean 14 to 18 seasons. Here’s the pitchers that make the most sense as comps.

NAME             WAA    IP  SEASONS
==================================
Clark Griffith  28.7   3386   20*
Chuck Finley    28.6   3197   17
Don Drysdale    28.6   3432   14
Mark Buehrle    28.4   3283   16
Tommy Bridges   27.0   2826   16
Eddie Cicotte   27.0   3226   14
Babe Adams      26.6   2995   19**
Billy Pierce    25.9   3307   18
Dizzy Trout     25.3   2726   15
Orel Hershiser  25.1   3130   18
Dwight Gooden   24.1   2801   16
Mark Langston   23.7   2963   16
Frank Viola     22.4   2836   15
Wilbur Cooper   22.0   3480   15
Larry Jackson   21.1   3263   14
Bucky Walters   20.4   3105   16
Javier Vazquez  19.3   2840   14
Tom Candiotti   19.2   2725   16
Lon Warneke     19.2   2782   15
*ignoring three token seasons totaling 3 appearances and 2 innings
**ignoring a token 4 IP season

That’s the kind of pitcher that we’re currently showing Barnhill as comparable to, and he would slot in just below Gooden. Which means, he’s pretty much on the line. His above-average pitcher batting helps a little bit. Overall, though if his 1947 and 1948 seasons are below the average we have for him now, he’ll drift downward. If they are better than that average, he’ll move up a tiny bit. He could use it.

Including the 1947 data suggests that he belongs in the company of everyone above from Langston down to Warneke, among whom resides only one HoME member, Bucky Walters.

William Bell

Mr. Number 2. Or 3. Bell ran off a fine career but virtually always played second fiddle to the more famous pitchers on his teams. Partly that’s because despite being a really good pitcher, he wasn’t a transcendent talent. Partly because he was more the slow-and-steady type. Partly because he played for highly successful teams with deep pockets who could afford the best talent.

Bell started out with the Kansas City Monarchs in 1923. That was Bullet Rogan’s team, and by the time Bell left, it was Andy Cooper’s team as much as Rogan’s. Our hero went eastward to Pittsburgh, where he played for the amazing Crawford nines of the early 1930s. There his mound mates included Satchel, himself, as well as the best years of Leroy Matlock’s career.

Despite playing in the shadows of the shadow leagues, Bell crafted a 118 ERA+ in seasons currently available on the Negro Leagues Database. Those seasons tilt slightly toward his decline phase and may not fully represent his career. The same, therefore, holds true for our MLE, but it’s a pretty good place to start.

William Bell
Negro Leagues Stats | Bio
Career: 1923–1937
Destination: NL 1923–1937
Missing Data: 1926, 1927 NNL, 1929, 1930
               PITCHING          |  BATTING    |  TOTAL
YEAR  AGE   IP  RAA   WAA   WAR  |   PA   WAR  |   WAR
=======================================================
1923   25  150    7   0.7   2.3  |   50   0.0  |   2.3
1924   26  170   14   1.5   3.2  |   57   0.0  |   3.2
1925   27  180   27   2.7   4.5  |   60   0.0  |   4.5
1926   28  200   26   2.8   4.8  |   67   0.0  |   4.8
1927   29  230   26   2.7   5.0  |   77   0.0  |   5.1
1928   30  240   21   2.2   4.7  |   80   0.1  |   4.8
1929   31  230   18   1.7   4.1  |   77   0.1  |   4.2
1930   32  230   14   1.2   3.7  |   77   0.1  |   3.8
1931   33  180    2   0.2   2.0  |   60   0.0  |   2.0
1932   34  240    4   0.4   2.9  |   80   0.1  |   2.9
1933   35  240    1   0.1   2.5  |   80   0.0  |   2.5
1934   36  230    8   0.8   3.2  |   77   0.1  |   3.3
1935   37  150  -11  -1.0   0.5  |   50   0.0  |   0.6
1936   38  200    9   0.9   3.0  |   67   0.1  |   3.1
1937   39  170    4   0.4   2.1  |   57   0.1  |   2.2
-------------------------------------------------------
TOTAL     3040  168  17.1  48.3  | 1016   0.8  |  49.1

Hypothetical MLB career rankings (1871–1960)

Innings pitched: 71st 
Pitching Wins Above Average: t-84th
Pitching Wins Above Replacement: 51st
Total Wins Above Replacement (pitchers only): 60th

Given that a good deal of data is missing, what we have here compares well to someone like Emil Leonard (3218 IP, 22.7 WAA), Bucky Walters (3105 IP, 20.4 WAA), Larry French (3152 IP, 18.1 WAA), Bob Shawkey (2937 IP, 18.1 WAA), and Chief Bender (3017 IP, 17.7 WAA). All pitchers you want on your team, none of whose pitching performances alone would get them into the Hall of Miller and Eric. Walters needed all his outstanding pitcher batting to just skate past the in/out line.

Ramon Bragaña

They called him “el Profesor” because of his highly intelligent approach to pitching. Bragaña pitched a few seasons in the Negro Leagues and for a zillion years in the Mexican League, plus winters in his home country of Cuba. He was too old by the time Jackie Robinson broke the color line to attract big league clubs, but in his salad days, he had a big league curveball to complement a good, hard fastball. He also mixed in a number of breaking pitches and changeups, hence his nickname. In a way, that description reminds of pitchers such as Luis Tiant, David Cone, and Orlando Hernandez. Though their repertoires weren’t identical, in their primes, they all matched a good fastball with a wipeout breaking ball while also improvising on the mound as necessary: dropping down, coming overhand, pitching backwards, trying different grips during the game—and doing all of those things with each pitch in their arsenal so that the hitter could never sit dead red on any pitch.

So it seems like he could really pitch. Examples: In Mexico in 1942 and 1943, Bragaña went full-on 1972 Steve Carlton. In 1942 he accounted for 22 of his basement-dwelling team’s 39 wins, tying for the league lead in victories. In 1943 he won 17 for another 38-win car wreck that just missed finishing last. In the Cuban Winter League between those two seasons, he spun a 39.2 inning scoreless streak. Not good enough for Ramon Bragaña! In 1944, he went 30-8 for a champion Vera Cruz squad that won 52 times. And like any good Negro Leagues pitcher, he could hit and play a decent right field as well.

Bragaña is a no-name in the US, but if our work is accurate or even close enough, then more people ought to know him north of the Rio Grande. He pitched forever, won a ton of games, but he liked to do his baseballing in the lower latitudes because he received better treatment, which led to his selection to the Salóns de Fama of both Cuba and Mexico. In addition to his long Mexican resume, he also pitched nine years in the Cuban Winter League. He’s considered one of the best Cuban pitchers ever, and James Riley mentions him alongside Martín Dihigo and Adolfo Luque, strangely forgetting Jose Mendez and el Tiante. Let’s hope we no longer forget Ramon Bragaña.

Ramon Bragaña
Negro Leagues Stats | Bio
Career: 1928–1955
Destination: NL 1930–1949
Missing data: 1929, 1931–1936, 1947 NAL, all Cuban Winter League games
Honors: Cuban Baseball Hall of Fame, Mexican Baseball Hall of Fame
               PITCHING          |   BATTING   |  TOTAL
YEAR  AGE   IP  RAA   WAA   WAR  |   PA   WAR  |   WAR
========================================================
1930   21  100   12   1.1   2.2  |   33   0.1  |   2.3
1931   22  150   10   1.0   2.6  |   50   0.2  |   2.8
1932   23  200   11   1.2   3.2  |   67   0.3  |   3.5
1933   24  240   11   1.2   3.6  |   80   0.3  |   3.9
1934   25  230   10   1.0   3.4  |   77   0.4  |   3.7
1935   26  250   11   1.1   3.6  |   83   0.3  |   4.1
1936   27  250   15   1.6   3.7  |   83   0.4  |   4.6
1937   28  220   21   2.2   2.9  |   73   0.3  |   4.8
1938   29  250   20   2.1   4.7  |   83   0.4  |   5.1
1939   30  200   19   2.1   3.9  |   67   0.3  |   4.4
1940   31  250   26   2.8   5.3  |   83   0.4  |   5.7
1941   32  190    7   0.8   2.7  |   63   0.3  |   3.0
1942   33  250    4   0.4   2.9  |   83   0.4  |   3.3
1943   34  250   20   2.3   4.8  |   83   0.3  |   5.0
1944   35  250   15   1.7   4.2  |   83   0.3  |   4.5
1945   36  180    8   0.8   2.6  |   60   0.2  |   2.8
1946   37  150  - 9  -1.0   0.5  |   50   0.2  |   0.7
1947   38  120  - 1  -0.1   1.1  |   40   0.2  |   1.3
1948   39  100    4   0.4   1.4  |   33   0.1  |   1.6
1949   40   30    1   0.1   0.4  |   10   0.0  |   0.4
-------------------------------------------------------
TOTAL     3860  213  23.0  62.0  | 1284   5.5  |  67.5

Hypothetical MLB career rankings (1871–1960)
Innings pitched: 28th
Pitching Wins Above Average: 55th
Pitching Wins Above Replacement: 26th
Total Wins Above Replacement (pitchers only): 19th

Well, all those Carltonesque victories in the early 1940s don’t actually translate as well as you might think. #KilltheWin. Let’s take a quick look at why.

1942

While he won 22 of his team’s 39, his runs allowed don’t appear to support his record. But first this important message: We don’t have formal Mexican League RA data, but we do have earned runs. Therefore, to determine RA9, we first have to estimate RA. Our MLE process backmaps to RA from ER by applying the ratio of the league’s runs scored to the league’s earned runs allowed to individual. When we do that Bragaña’s RA9 ends up at 4.62. The league scored 4.87 runs per nine. That suggests that el Profesor’s run support could have been very high; that he got very lucky; that like Tom Glavine, he was masterful at influencing the opposition’s sequencing of balls in play; and/or that our estimates for his unearned runs are too high. Whatever the case, he was only 5% better than the league by our way of doing things.

1943

The next year, when he won 17 of his team’s 38 victories, Bragaña gave up 3.91 runs per game, and the league scored 4.05 per game. That’s four percent better than the league, and not exactly Walter Johnson.

1944

Finally, the big 30-win enchilada. Ramon looks a little better time, yielding 4.09 runs to the league’s 4.63 runs per game. Twelve percent better than the league is a little more like it, but still nothing to win thirty games with.

So we’re left with a pitcher in the mode of Jack Quinn, Eppa Rixey, Bobo Newsom, or Waite Hoyt, though perhaps a little better. Well, and a much better hitter, which makes a big difference. Bragaña appears to be a distinctly better than Red Ruffing, Burleigh Grimes, and Early Wynn who all earned noticeably fewer WAA, and his batting value is in their class, so he might well be a better candidate than they are. But he’s in a class below the likes of Ted Lyons or Red Faber, both of whom have more innings and more value above average, and Clark Griffith who has fewer innings and about 5 more wins above average.

Final note: Bragaña pitched from 1931–1936 throughout Latin America in a variety of non-Negro Leagues settings. Many were not top-drawer teams or leagues. We give him his career average performance during these seasons with the understanding that in a major league setting, that sort of peripatetic free agent shuffling was extremely unlikely.

Gene Bremer

Bremer might be most famous for something he’d rather not have taken part in. On September 7, 1942, he rode in a car with five other members of the Cincinnati Buckeyes. The driver, the team’s catcher, Ulysses “Buster” Brown died instantly when a truck hit the car from behind. Raymond “Smokey” Owens also died on the scene. Players Gene Bremer and Herman Watts required hospitalization, while Alonzo Boone escaped with scrapes and bruises. The team’s owner, Wilbur Hayes,  also escaped major injury. By the way, this is a completely separate from a less well known accident in 1941 that injured Sam Jethroe and, more fatefully, Luke Easter.

Gene Bremer was lucky, though, that his injuries didn’t hamper his play. He returned in 1943 and pitched at his normal level. That normal level was very good, but only rarely at an All-Star level. He contributed strongly to the talented Cleveland Buckeyes teams of the mid 1940s. The sketchy stats available at BBREF suggest that he declined quickly after 1945, but all sources agree that his career at the top levels reached its end in 1948.

We are however, missing considerable information about Bremer. His 1946–1948 seasons are not yet in the Negro Leagues Database, and they could reveal that he didn’t decline as gradually as we’ve mapped it here but still produced at a high level for another year or two. Similarly, his 1938 season in the NAL could also reveal a fine age-21 season. The weird one, however, is 1941. There’s nothing in any records about it. James Riley says only that he was “out of baseball.” For now we’re assuming that in an MLB setting he would have remained on the field. But if anyone has information that would clarify his situation, we’d be glad to incorporate it into our MLE.

Gene Bremer
Negro Leagues Stats | Bio
Career: 1936–1948 
Destination: NL 1936–1948 
Missing data: 1941, 1948

               PITCHING          |  BATTING    |  TOTAL
YEAR  AGE  IP   RAA   WAA   WAR  |  PA    WAR  |   WAR
=======================================================
1936   19   10    1   0.2   0.3  |    3   0.0  |   0.3
1937   20  200    8   0.9   2.9  |   67   0.4  |   3.3
1938   21  160  - 1  -0.1   1.6  |   53   0.4  |   2.0
1939   22  180    1   0.1   2.0  |   60   0.4  |   2.4
1940   23  270  -21  -2.1   0.7  |   90   0.6  |   1.3
1941   24  200    1   0.1   2.1  |   67   0.5  |   2.6
1942   25  180   12   1.5   3.2  |   60   0.4  |   3.6
1943   26  220   12   1.4   3.6  |   73   0.4  |   4.0
1944   27  230   10   1.1   3.4  |   77   0.4  |   3.8
1945   28  250   17   1.8   4.4  |   83   0.4  |   4.8
1946   29  260  -20  -2.2   0.5  |   87   0.6  |   1.0
1947   30  140    6   0.6   2.0  |   47   0.3  |   2.3
1948   31  140    2   0.2   1.6  |   47   0.3  |   1.9
-------------------------------------------------------
TOTAL     2440   29   3.5  28.2  |  814   5.1  |  33.3

Hypothetical MLB career rankings (1871–1960)
Innings pitched: 139th
Pitching Wins Above Average: t-339th
Pitching Wins Above Replacement: 162nd
Total Wins Above Replacement (pitchers only): 129th

Bremer’s career, in terms of playing time and wins above average looks like Allie Reynolds, Hal Schumacher, or Johnny Vandermeer dozens of hurlers we’ve likely never heard of. Good sometimes, never very good, sometimes bad, but not someone that we’re going to be thinking about when it’s time to fill out a ballot.

* * *

Next time around, we’ll look at the best catchers among the rest with a fivesome of Regino Garcia, Joe Green, Elston Howard, Bruce Petway, and Doc Wiley.

Advertisements

Discussion

One thought on “Evaluating More Negro Leagues Pitchers, Part 1

  1. Nice article Eric! Not a lot of potentials for my Hall of Merit Ballot (though I’ll give Bragana a closer look) but its really fun to learn about players I’ve never heard of before (Bell was the only one I had heard of). Definitely looking forward to seeing some of Elston Howard’s pre-MLB MLEs to get a better picture of him. Also, looking forward to seeing Bruce Petway. He supposedly had a cannon arm and rated well in some lists of great Negro Leaguers back in the 50s. He also was the starting catcher on my Imagine Sports playoff team from a few years back! I’ll be honest that I haven’t heard of the other 3 catchers, but I’m looking forward to learning about them too!

    Posted by CARL J GOETZ | January 17, 2018, 11:33 am

Tell us what you think!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Institutional History

Advertisements
%d bloggers like this: